Archive for dialogue

Sit back and relax with ‘Good Hair’

Posted in ESL, Movies, you tube with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 10, 2010 by EslImaginarium

‘Hair is important spiritually, culturally and integral to our self esteem.’

Good Hair

Official trailer:

The Plot:

Chris Rock, a man with two daughters, asks about good hair, as defined by Black Americans, mostly Black women. He visits Bronner Brothers’ annual hair convention in Atlanta. He tells us about sodium hydroxide, a toxin used to relax hair. He looks at weaves, and he travels to India where tonsure ceremonies produce much of the hair sold in America. A weave is expensive: he asks who makes the money. We visit salons and barber shops, central to the Black community. Rock asks men if they can touch their mates’ hair – no, its decoration. Various talking heads (many of them women with good hair) comment. It’s about self-image. Maya Angelou and Tracie Thoms provide perspective.

Click the title below for listening and reading comprehension questions about the trailer and the plot:

Good Hair worksheet 1

How much does it cost?

Click on the title below for a student worksheet on the above clip and also some extra questions.

Good Hair worksheet 2

Bad hair day

Below is a clip from an article featured in the ‘Wall Street Journal.

Click here for the full article.

‘When A Bad Hair Day Brings You Down’

Scientists at P & G, with help from a Yale psychology professor, surveyed women, before and after using Pantene products, using a questionnaire that psychology researchers use to measure mood. They found women felt less “hostile,” “ashamed,” “nervous,” “guilty” or “jittery,” depending on the hair products they used, while at other times they said they felt more “excited,” “proud” and “interested.”

Lets talk about hair:

Celebrity hair styles

Ask the students if they can think of any celebrity hair icons.

Show students the following icons and ask them if they have ever had a similar hair cut or would like a hair cut like these celebrities.

Crazy hair styles

Ask students if they think a hair style can reflect your personality.

Show students the following photos and ask what they think the models personalities are.

Click below for the accompanying worksheet :

Good Hair worksheet 3

Selling a style

Ask students if they are influenced by hair advertising.

Show students the following hair adverts.

‘Because we’re worth it’:

‘Hair comes alive’:

Discuss the adverts:

Students are put into groups and have to discuss the questions on the worksheet.

After discussing the questions they have to come up with a slogan to sell a hair product.

Each group presents their slogan and the class vote on the best slogan.

Please click on the title below for the accompanying worksheet:

Good Hair worksheet 4

Hair Styles

Ask students if they know the names of different hair styles e.x. short/long etc.

Wordle time– Do you recognise any of the styles? can you match them with the pictures below?

Click for the accompanied worksheet: Good Hair worksheet 5

Male styles

Female Styles

Role play:

After completing the worksheet the students make pairs and pretend they are going to get their hair cut.  One student will play the role of the hair dresser and the other as the customer.

Monitor and give advice to the students.  Ask the best pairs to demonstrate their role play to the class.  Students vote on the best role play.

Some final words

For more media on this subject you should check out this excellent documentary by pop star, Jamile and  this episode from the Tyra Banks chat show.

After all this talk about hair I just realised it’s time to go for a haircut.  So I will leave you with this:

Any suggestions or comments are welcomed below & for more activities from the imaginarium please sign up.  Cheers and happy hair cuts.

‘Morph’ & ‘Pingu’ – The power of gestures

Posted in ESL, you tube with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 27, 2010 by EslImaginarium

I loved watching the characters, ‘Morph’ and ‘Pingu’ when I was a child and even though I did not understand the ‘gobledygook’ language they spoke I was able to understand and find entertainment in their adventures.  The key to their success was their over emphasised gestures and humorous stories.  You can use the following lesson as an example of how important gestures are.

1. Morph

Morph – Bed Time

Students watch the following clip a few times before they are asked questions about it.

Questions about the clip

  1. What does ‘Morph’ want to do?     He wants to go to sleep.
  2. What does ‘Chas'(cream-coloured)want to do?    He wants to listen to music.
  3. What does the sign say on ‘Morph’s’ wooden pencil box?     ‘Please do not disturb’
  4. Why is ‘Morph’ not happy?     Because Chas is playing the music too loud.
  5. What is ‘Morph’s’ solution to the problem?     To put earphones on ‘Chas’.
  6. Why is ‘Morph’ still not happy?     Because ‘Chas’ continues to sing very loud.

Talk about a time when you could not get to sleep because you were distracted.  What did you do to try to get to sleep?  drink milk, count sheep etc.

Imagine that Morph and Chas could now speak English.  In pairs the students write down what you think that they are saying to each other in the clip. With the sound turned off  the students talk over the clip with their dialogue.  The class decides which pair had the best dialogue.

2. Pingu


Pingu – ‘Bouncing’

Students watch the following clip a few times before they are asked questions about it.

Stop the clip at 1.58 and ask the students ‘What do you think ‘Pingu’ and his father are going to make?’

Write up the suggestions and watch the clip to see if the students were correct.

wordle:

Students have to put in order the objects ‘Pingu’ jumped on.  They write a number next to the word.

Writing & discussion:

Write down what happens in the clip.

Why was ‘Pingu’s’ mother upset?

What did she do to punish ‘Pingu’?

Can you remember something naughty you did when you were a child?  How were you punished?

What do you think is the correct way to punish children when they do something wrong?

Write down some notes and form an anecdote about your childhood memory.

Talk to other students about your childhood experience.

Let’s perform:

Students form groups of 3.  Tell the students that ‘Pingu’s family can now speak English.  The students have to each choose a character from ‘pingu’ and write a dialogue for the clip they have just seen.  Students perform their dialogue with the sound turned off and the class decides who has the most original dialogue.

The power of gestures:


In groups the students write their own ‘Morph’ or ‘Pingu’ story.

They have to think about the gestures for their story.

The students perform their story using only gestures to tell the story.

The other students watch and  discuss what they thought about each performance.

Working this F*$#!ing job

Posted in ESL, Music, Uncategorized, you tube with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2010 by EslImaginarium

*Warning NSFC-Controversy in the classroom*


Show this clip at the students discretion only.  Advise the students that the following clip is a little controversial and that if they are of a sensitive disposition then maybe it’s best that they do not watch the clip. This clip contains risky language and some scenes of violence.  You could easily edit it so that the words are deleted from the video.

Watch the music video:

Drive by truckers – Working this job

Controversy issues:


Start a discussion about censorship in videos.  Ask the following questions.

1. Why do you think they use the “f-Word” ?

2. What do you think about the use of violence in this clip?

3. What impact did the violence and language have on you?

4. Is it really necessary to include the violence and f-word?

5.  Does it relate to the song and video?   Why?

6.  Is this clip being controversial just to provoke people, which will in turn generate more sales through the media exposure?

Lights, Camera, Action

Students choose from 3 scenes in the clip.  They write a dialogue for the scene and then act it out.

(0.43) Scene outside ‘burger world’.  Dialogue between the  boss of ‘burger world’ and the protagonist.

(2.05) Scene with the man robbing the store. Dialogue between the store clerk and the protagonist.

(3.25) Scene with the police confrontation.  Dialogue between the policeman and the protagonist.

Lyrics – What lyrics do you hear?

Students listen to the clip a few times and write down as many lyrics as they can.

The students compare the lyrics they have written with the other students.

Story time


The students use the lyrics to help them write a story about the clip.

Ask some questions for them to think about.

Why did the man do this?

What were his responsibilities?

“What makes it all worthwhile?”

“Can a family live on fast food wages?”

Game–  In groups students try to write down as many jobs as they can in a set time limit (5mins).

Each group reads out the jobs they have written and if the other groups have the same word then they score it out.  The groups only get points if they have a different word from the other groups.  Subtract points for wrong spelling.

Word magnet-(My first attempt)

Please click here to watch Russell Stannard’s training video about word magnets.

If students have computers in your class room then this application is really good.  If they don’t then use sheets of paper.

Students have to write down as many job words as they can and then separate them into what they consider to be worthwhile jobs and  not worthwhile.

Let’s debate about jobs


When they have divided the jobs into categories the students have a debate about their opinions and why they consider some jobs more worthwhile than others.

Call out a job and have the students who think it is worthwhile go to one side of the classroom and the other students go to the other side.  Both sides think about what they can say to support their arguments in a debate.  Each side is given a time limit to present their ideas.

Some final words

Students have to think about and then discuss what they think is important in life and what responsibilities they have.

How to train your dragon (esl trailer-Dialogue)

Posted in ESL, Movies, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 6, 2010 by EslImaginarium

How to :   Offering practical advice and detailed instruction on an activity.


Listen to the trailer without watching

1. Dictation activity.

Students have to listen to the trailer and write what they hear.  Students are the controller of the video and can ask the teacher to stop/rewind/play.

2. Cloze activity

Students are given the dialogue and are asked to fill in the gaps.

Hiccup: This is my _home____, we have __fishing_____, hunting and a charming view of the __sunsets_____.

The only __problems__ are the pests.  You see, some places have _mice__ or mosquitoes, we have dragons.  Fighting ___dragons__ is everything around here.

My name is ‘Hiccup”.  Iv’e always wanted to be a _great__ viking.

Viking: Oh no you __don’t___.

Hiccup: Oh, come on let me out.  I need to __make__ my mark.

Viking: You can’t lift a __hammer____,  you can’t swing an axe,  you can’t even __throw__ one of these.

Hiccup: But this will throw it for me.

Did I _hit__ it?

Yes, I hit it.   I have brought __down__ his mighty beast.

Hiccup:  eh, _nice__ dragon.  Okay.

no,no, no

mmmmmmmm

eughhhh

Astrid: Get __down___.

Hiccup:  It’s okay.  Astrid,  toothless.

Astrid: You are sooooo busted.

Hiccup: da,da,da,da,da we’re __dead___.

Viking: Either we finish them or they’ll __finish____ us.

Hiccup: Everything we __know____ about them is worng.

Viking: You’re crazy, I ___like__ that.

Hiccup: Let me __show____ you.  Gently

Thank you for ___nothing____ you useless reptile.

3. Questions about Hiccup and his home(answer using sentences)

1.  What is the only problem about Hiccups home?

The pests are the only problem about his home.

2. What two activities can you do?

You can do fishing and hunting.

3.  What view is charming?

The sunsets are charming.

4.   What pests do some places have?

Some places have mice or mosquitoes.

5.  What is everything around there?

Fighting dragons is everything around there.

6.   What has he always wanted to be?

He has always wanted to be a great Viking.

7.   What does he need to do?

He needs to make his mark.

8. What 3 things can’t he do?

He can’t lift a hammer, swing an axe or throw one of these.

9. What does he bring down?

He has brought down a mighty beast.

4. Madlibs

In groups the students try to fill in the gaps with their own ideas.  The funniest mad lib wins.

This is my home.  We have _skiing_____, __snowboarding_ and a ___beautiful__ view of the ___moon_____.

The only problems are the _monsters__.  You see most places have _goblins___ or __trolls____.  We have __yeti___. ___kissing__ __Yeti____is everything around here.

My name is ___Andy____.  I’ve always wanted to be a _great warrior ___




How to train your dragon (esl trailer-JING)

Posted in ESL, Movies with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2010 by EslImaginarium

How to :   Offering practical advice and detailed instruction on an activity.

How to use jing with a movie trailer.

I have recently discovered the wonder of jing after using the wonderful website by Russell Stannard.  His website is perfect for all you technophobes out there and I find his videos are very user friendly and describe how to use applications in layman’s terms without any torturous technical  jargon.

Jing is software which you can use to capture images or videos in realtime using your computer.


I have decided to use it to for making voiceovers for movie trailers.

In this task students are asked to use jing to capture their description of the trailer.

The teacher can show the students how to use the application and then set it as a task for homework.   Students have to send the link via e.mail to the teacher.

Alternatively they could carry this task out in the class and perform it in front of the other students.


Here is an example of this software in action:

Unfortunately it is clear why it is maybe best to not use this software for capturing video material as it will become fragmented and it takes a while to download the video.  If you have the time to wait for the download then it does show an example of recording your students voices over material.

Click here for my first jing.


In this example I used my glamorous assitant Susan who is the creator of the delcious food blogg; Bendi Benri.  Cheers for that Suzie you are the best cook in the world.

Using the trailer to write a dialogue for the scene

Another example for using jing would be to record a voiceover dialogue between the characters in the clip.

Stop the trailer at 1.56.


In pairs the students have to write a dialogue between ‘Hiccup’ and the girl.

Students can check how there dialogue compares with the original:

Hiccup:     It’s okay.  ‘Astrid,”toothless’

Girl:            You are so busted.

Hiccup:     da,da,da,da,da we’re dead.

With both activities above you could get the class to vote for their best and you could record the best and show it to the class or if you have a class blogg then you could put it up for all the students to see online.

Will I use jing again?

I’m really frustrated that it was not able to capture the trailer smoothly and also at the time it took for it to donwload.  I do believe it will be excellent, however, to provide feedback to essays and also to describe pictures rather than trailers.